Skip to content

Advertisement

  • Speaker presentation
  • Open Access

Point of care testing for improving risk- benefit ratio of aspirin and warfarin

  • 1,
  • 2,
  • 2,
  • 1,
  • 1,
  • 3,
  • 4,
  • 3,
  • 5,
  • 5,
  • 6,
  • 2 and
  • 1
Molecular Cytogenetics20147(Suppl 1):I54

https://doi.org/10.1186/1755-8166-7-S1-I54

Published: 21 January 2014

Keywords

  • Colorectal Cancer
  • Aspirin
  • Warfarin
  • Care Setting
  • Primary Care Setting

The increase in identification of putative biomarkers and opportunities to develop tailored treatments are due to emergence of omics technologies. Application of pharmacogenetic knowledge with the help of quick and cheap companion diagnostics in the primary care setting is expected to deliver improved treatment and reduced heathcare costs. Warfarin and aspirin are the two most widely prescribed drugs for preventing cardiovascular diseases. Long term aspirin use has also been shown to reduce risk, recurrence and mortality from colorectal cancer. However, they both have narrow therapeutic windows and several genetic polymorphisms have been noted to influence their dose and efficacy. We therefore have launched two collaborative projects: first, to study the genetics of warfarin safety in the Gujarati Indian population and second, to identify further polymorphisms that modulates aspirin’s colorectal cancer chemopreventive efficacy. Understanding the impact of polymorphisms on dose and efficacy for these drugs would lead to development of a combined panel of markers that would predict accurate therapeutic dose with minimal risk for adverse reactions. These markers will be deployed at the point of care settings using a novel handheld genotyping device which will use disposable microfluidic cassettes and silicon nanowires currently developed by QuantuMDx. Results, future work, opportunities and barriers will be examined.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Institute of Genetic Medicine, International Centre for Life, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
(2)
Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, St. James Hospital, Leeds, UK
(3)
QuantuMDx Ltd., International Centre for Life, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
(4)
Institute of Cellular Medicine, Medical School, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
(5)
FRIGE House, Satellite, FRIGE’s Institute of Human Genetics, Ahmedabad, India
(6)
CIMS Hospital, Ahmedabad, India

Copyright

© Sheth et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

Advertisement