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Table 1 Chromosomal mosaicism in presumably normal human tissues.

From: Chromosomal mosaicism goes global

Tissue Description References
Ovarian tissues Small, but significant proportion of aneuploid cells (trisomy 21) in ovarian tissues of normal female fetuses [15]
  15–20% of human oocytes [19]
Sperm 2–10% of spermatozoa (0.1–0.2% per chromosome) [20]
Chorionic villi approaching 24% (~1% of aneuploid cells per chromosome) [13]
Fetal human brain approaching 30% (~1.5 of aneuploid cells per chromosome) 35% including chromosomal mosaicism confined to the fetal brain [3, 13]
Placenta No generalized data; chromosomal mosaicism observed in ~2% of foetuses (9–11 weeks of gestation) referred to prenatal diagnosis [21]
Skin (adults) 2,2% and 4,4% (in young and old individuals, respectively) [22]
Liver (adults) ~3% [23]
Blood (adults) 1–2% (randomly selected autosomes) and 3% (chromosome X) [24]
Adult human brain 0.1–0.7% (autosomes and chromosome Y), 2% (chromosome X); tending to approach 10%, in total [3, 4, 6]